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The DMA Digest is an edited gathering of information relative to DMA United's business model. With the goal of propelling deal flow and internal awareness, the criteria we use in selecting these topics is reflective of our company philosophy: innovation is born from a polycultural and multi-disciplinarian environment.

Why International Beauty Brands Are Piling into South Korea

Global players from Givenchy Beauty to Sephora are targeting the growing opportunity in South Korea, but a phalanx of homegrown brands stands in their way.

SEOUL, South Korea — Walking down the streets of Seoul, it’s impossible not to see the vast influence of K-beauty, shorthand for South Korea’s local beauty industry. The bustling Myeongdong neighbourhood features homegrown cosmetics shops touting snail slime, a signature ingredient in Korean beauty products whose promises of glowing skin, wrapped in appealing packaging, have hooked consumers in the country and beyond.

In the past five years, K-beauty exports have grown from $1 billion in 2012 to $2.64 billion in 2017, according to the Korea Customs Service. The surge has gone hand-in-hand with hallyu, a South Korean cultural wave that has swept the globe, especially in China. But despite the upswing, Korean brands are facing increasing competition at home from global luxury players.

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Men’s Brands Breathe New Life Onto Bleecker Street

Newcomers such as Huckberry, Buck Mason and Slightly Alabama are drawing a casual men's wear shopper to the area.
Bleecker Street has become a magnet for men’s wear.

The once-red hot stretch of the West Village stumbled badly over the past few years as nationally known names such as Marc Jacobs, Brunello Cucinelli and Ralph Lauren exited in the face of escalating rents and declining sales.

In fact, at its lowest point last year, there was a 25 percent vacancy rate for all of Bleecker from the East to West Villages, according to Chelsea Mullen, marketing director of the Skylight Group, which has been working to revitalize the street.

Joel Isaacs, founder and president of Isaacs and Co., a key real estate broker for the area, said a primary reason for the “revival” on Bleecker is that “rents have corrected and have gone from $600 a square foot to around $200.”

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THE 'MARY POPPINS RETURNS' COSTUMES ARE JUST AS MAGICAL AS THE MOVIE

"It was the first movie I saw — a long time ago," says "Mary Poppins Returns" costume designer Sandy Powell, about the original 1964 classic children's film starring Julie Andrews in the titular role. "I do remember Mary Poppins's dress, and that's always stayed with me. Also, the fact that, you realize now, you know all the words to the songs still."

It's all come full circle as the three-time Oscar-winner (and nine-time — so far — nominee) excitedly took on the momentous job of bringing everyone's favorite flying nanny, the Banks siblings and co. forward two decades via costume. Grown-up Jane (Emily Mortimer) and Michael (Ben Whishaw) are raising the latter's three children after his wife's death a year ago. Money management hasn't ever been his thing, either, so the family home is in jeopardy of repossession.

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12.19.18

Why International Beauty Brands Are Piling into South Korea

Global players from Givenchy Beauty to Sephora are targeting the growing opportunity in South Korea, but a phalanx of homegrown brands stands in their way.

SEOUL, South Korea — Walking down the streets of Seoul, it’s impossible not to see the vast influence of K-beauty, shorthand for South Korea’s local beauty industry. The bustling Myeongdong neighbourhood features homegrown cosmetics shops touting snail slime, a signature ingredient in Korean beauty products whose promises of glowing skin, wrapped in appealing packaging, have hooked consumers in the country and beyond.

In the past five years, K-beauty exports have grown from $1 billion in 2012 to $2.64 billion in 2017, according to the Korea Customs Service. The surge has gone hand-in-hand with hallyu, a South Korean cultural wave that has swept the globe, especially in China. But despite the upswing, Korean brands are facing increasing competition at home from global luxury players.

Continue Reading

Men’s Brands Breathe New Life Onto Bleecker Street

Newcomers such as Huckberry, Buck Mason and Slightly Alabama are drawing a casual men's wear shopper to the area.
Bleecker Street has become a magnet for men’s wear.

The once-red hot stretch of the West Village stumbled badly over the past few years as nationally known names such as Marc Jacobs, Brunello Cucinelli and Ralph Lauren exited in the face of escalating rents and declining sales.

In fact, at its lowest point last year, there was a 25 percent vacancy rate for all of Bleecker from the East to West Villages, according to Chelsea Mullen, marketing director of the Skylight Group, which has been working to revitalize the street.

Joel Isaacs, founder and president of Isaacs and Co., a key real estate broker for the area, said a primary reason for the “revival” on Bleecker is that “rents have corrected and have gone from $600 a square foot to around $200.”

Continue Reading

THE 'MARY POPPINS RETURNS' COSTUMES ARE JUST AS MAGICAL AS THE MOVIE

"It was the first movie I saw — a long time ago," says "Mary Poppins Returns" costume designer Sandy Powell, about the original 1964 classic children's film starring Julie Andrews in the titular role. "I do remember Mary Poppins's dress, and that's always stayed with me. Also, the fact that, you realize now, you know all the words to the songs still."

It's all come full circle as the three-time Oscar-winner (and nine-time — so far — nominee) excitedly took on the momentous job of bringing everyone's favorite flying nanny, the Banks siblings and co. forward two decades via costume. Grown-up Jane (Emily Mortimer) and Michael (Ben Whishaw) are raising the latter's three children after his wife's death a year ago. Money management hasn't ever been his thing, either, so the family home is in jeopardy of repossession.

Continue Reading

12.18.18

Solving Beauty’s Packaging Problem

Last year, the beauty sector generated 142.6 billion units of packaging, most of which ended up in landfill.

NEW YORK, United States — When makeup artist Kirsten Kjaer Weis launched her brand in 2010, she set out to create products that were luxurious but organic and eco-friendly. She settled on refillable metal compacts to house her products, eliminating the need to buy makeup encased in plastic packaging. Retailers loved the sleek casing, but they were confused by the refill concept, which didn’t fit the brand’s luxury image. It was a challenge to convince them her brand was worth betting on.

“They just couldn’t wrap their heads around that it was luxury and it was green, all-in-one,” she said. “It was like retelling a new story in a sense about what colour cosmetics could be.”

Fast forward eight years: sustainability has been catapulted into the mainstream and Weis is stocked at big retailers from Barneys and Neiman Marcus to Net-a-Porter and Cult Beauty. Beauty and personal care products are in the crosshairs of environmental activists because they come encased in masses of packaging — often high in plastic — that ends up in landfills and must be frequently replenished. The sector generated 142.6 billion units of packaging in 2017, according to Euromonitor International, with over 40 percent made from the rigid plastics, which are considered particularly harmful for the environment because often they are "single use," used just once before they are thrown away.

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Influence Peddler: The Sustainability Bunch

A burgeoning pack of stylish women — whether their following is mega or micro — are peddling their influence into sustainability. Here are five notable ones from across the globe using their platforms to promote ethical fashion brands, spread eco-conscious messages and encourage users to create a positive impact on the planet:

Trash Is for Tossers

Name: Lauren Singer

City: New York

Instagram followers: 272,000

Who is she: Singer was an environmental studies major in college who made the conscious decision to live “zero waste” in 2012. She learned about Bea Johnson, a woman in California who was producing little to no garbage, when she decided to join the cause and lessen her impact on the environment. In addition to her account and namesake blog, she has founded The Simply Co., a three-ingredient organic and vegan laundry detergent. She also set up the Package Free Shop in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn selling products with no or recyclable packages.

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WHAT WILL BE THE NEXT WAVE OF MERCH TRENDS IN 2019?

It’s been a long 12 months, and before we kick 2018 to the curb, we're looking back at all of the most memorable, game-changing fashion and beauty things that went down. Follow along with us as we look back at the year in review.

Ever since we first started seeing the comeback of music merchandise in 2016, the rise of branded, promotional apparel hasn't stopped. Instead, it's evolved and shapeshifted, tapping into more industries, subcultures and communities over the years. In 2018 alone, we've seen collegiate merch make its way onto high-fashion runways, while media brands pivoted to clothing for increased revenue. Plus, all things highbrow, including museums and news outlets, have gotten in on the merch trend, as well as food and drink businesses.

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“MEN FOR OTHERS, MY ASS”: AFTER KAVANAUGH, INSIDE GEORGETOWN PREP’S CULTURE OF OMERTÀ

For generations, the renowned Jesuit prep school groomed its students to live up to its lofty mantra of service and sacrifice. But after Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony, the school and its alumni are contending with other demons.

It’s late October, homecoming weekend for Georgetown Prep, class of ’83, the one that Brett Kavanaugh made famous, featuring P.J., Squi, Timmy, Tom, Tobin, Mark Judge, et al. Earlier today, the Hoyas football team gave Kavanaugh, sporting a bright-red baseball hat, a hero’s welcome. Victory was in the air. Prep, as it’s known, was in the middle of trouncing ng Episcopal, 24–6. Kavanaugh had finally clinched his seat on the Supreme Court, after all those ridiculous attacks on his character. Now, the alumni have gathered in a generic, brightly lit room at Pinstripes, a sprawling restaurant and bowling alley in Bethesda, Maryland.

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12.17.18

Cannabis for the One Percent

Retailers are vying to be the Net-a-Porter, Goop and Sephora of CBD, seeing the cannabis-derived product as the next big thing in luxury beauty. One obstacle: CBD is still not entirely legal.

NEW YORK, United States — At Miss Grass, wellness junkies can stock up on $150 facial serum infused with cannibidiol (CBD), $55 hemp and sage honey and a rose gold CBD vape pen. None of these products will get you high, but they are definitely high end.

The market for luxury products made from the non-psychoactive parts of the marijuana plant is exploding. Inserting full spectrum CBD or cannabis sativa seed soil into everything from chocolate to moisturisers has gone from a taboo to the mainstream as dozens of US states remove prohibitions on pot. The products themselves have migrated from head shops to the beauty counter at Barneys New York almost as quickly.

Miss Grass, White Label CBD Market and Fleur Marché, which launches next week, are competing to be the Sephora, Goop and Net-a-Porter of cannabis. Plenty of traditional retailers, from Sephora to Neiman Marcus, are joining the green rush as well. They offer an increasingly vast mix of serums, tinctures, edibles and other products, with an emphasis on beauty and wellness that plays on CBD’s purported anti-inflammatory and anxiety-relief abilities.

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LVMH: Vuitton, Moët — Now Hotels

The French luxury group's $2.6 billion acquisition of Belmond allows it to significantly expand its footprint in experiential luxury.

PARIS — Everybody wants experiences — and LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton wants to make sure it’s ready to provide them.

The luxury giant’s surprise $2.6 billion acquisition of Belmond is aimed at bulking up the group’s hospitality operations globally and position it as much of a leading player in experiential luxury as it is in fashion, leather goods and prestige wines and spirits.

There is plenty to play for. Luxury hospitality is forecast to generate revenues of 190 billion euros in 2018, up 5 percent at constant exchange, representing 16 percent of the global 1.2-trillion-euro luxury goods market, according to management consulting firm Bain & Co.

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THE TOP 25 FASHION SCHOOLS IN THE WORLD: 2018

From location to tuition to resources, there are a lot of factors to consider and compare when choosing a school — and not as much guidance available as there is for more "traditional" fields of study. That's why, since 2010, we've put together rankings of the best fashion schools culled from data and our own extensive surveys.

We kicked things up a notch this year, asking much more detailed questions of the nearly 4,000 students who took our survey, and of the colleges we ranked, to provide a more accurate, informative and — most importantly — helpful guide to choosing a fashion school.

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Meghan Markle Will Finally Return to the United States—With Her New Baby in Tow

As 2018 draws to a close, Meghan Markle can step back and reflect on a monumental year—and she’s already preparing to make 2019 even bigger.

While she and Prince Harry prepare to welcome their first baby in the spring, the Duchess of Sussex has asked aides to fill her diary “right up to her due date” because she feels “fit and well and wants to continue working as long as possible,” according to one source.

The former actress, whose admirable work ethic has not gone unnoticed by the Queen, is planning to take a short maternity leave by royal standards—less than six months—and returning in time for an autumn tour of the U.S. and Canada, which courtiers are said to be in the early stages of planning. The precise timing depends on her actual due date, which remains a closely guarded secret.

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12.10.18

Vogue Asks H&M: Can Fast Fashion Be Green?

In two decades, the H&M Group has grown from a medium-sized European retail chain to the second-largest garment company in the world, producing approximately 3 billion items per year to sell across its 4,800 stores. But a recent drop in sales and profits have forced the Swedish giant to face its structural issues, including a production process which led to $4.3 billion of unsold clothes in early 2018.

“The old brick-and-mortar [model of] just pump up new stores, push out garments into stores and someone will buy them, is dead,” David Sävman, H&M Group’s head of production, said at a recent meeting in Hong Kong. He was addressing the winning founders of this year’s Global Change Awards, an annual event organised by the H&M Foundation, the non-profit arm of the Swedish company. (Full disclosure: Vogue was a guest of the foundation, who paid for flights and accommodation.) “We have to produce what people want to buy and not hope that they want to buy what we have produced. That model is not sustainable.”

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HOW SNEAKER BRANDS FINALLY CATERED TO WOMEN IN 2018

It’s been a long 12 months, and before we kick 2018 to the curb, we're looking back at all of the most memorable, game-changing fashion and beauty things that went down. Follow along with us as we look back at the year in review.

At the beginning of the year, Nike released one of its biggest launches for women. The global sportswear brand gave 14 of its female employees the task of creating brand-new takes on some of its most iconic silhouettes, the Air Force 1 and Air Jordan 1. The collection, called Nike 1 Reimagined, boasted a total of 10 styles and upon its release, the first drop sold out, says Jenna Golden, director of Nike's North America Communications team. This winter, Nike released a mid-calf boot version of its Air Force 1 Sage, and has plans to expand on Reimagined with more silhouettes in 2019.

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Just 20 fashion companies are making almost all of the industry’s profits

The global fashion business is becoming increasingly polarized.

Take a look at the big players in the industry: On one side, you’ll find a handful of brands and retailers that, because of their scale, design, price, business model, or all of the above, generate the great majority of the industry’s profits. On the other side, pretty much everyone else.

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Mumbai’s Xanadu

The wife of India’s richest man, Nita Ambani has set herself apart as a passionate philanthropist, leading the development of a model township, an elite school, and a Premier League cricket team. Still, Mumbai can’t stop talking about the 27-story, 570-foot-tall, 400,000-square-foot mansion that her family moved into two months ago. Click through to peek into the luxurious life of the Ambani family. For James Reginato’s profile, read the June 2012 issue of Vanity Fair.

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